Saturday Seminars at York University 2014-2015; Portraiture, Self Portraiture, the Nicholsons and Philosophy of Art

Teaching a course on landscape, 2014

Description

Self-Portraiture: A Mirror for the Artist
Since the Renaissance, self-portraiture has become one of the most intriguing expressions of artists. Are they laying their souls bare, posturing for the public, practising their craft, or exploring fundamental questions of mortality, humanity and sexuality? In this session, we will look at Picasso, Courbet, Rembrandt, Durer, Van Gogh and Stanley Spencer, among others. We will compare how and why they create autobiographical statements and how these reflect the changing roles that artists play in society.

Day: Saturday
Start date: 11 October 2014
Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
Full fee: £35.00

Portraiture: A Mirror for Society
Portraiture is the most ubiquitous genre of early modern and modern times. It gives us a rich source of information about the way individuals have seen themselves, and have wished to present themselves both to their contemporaries and to posterity. However, the patrons are at the mercy of the portraitist, who may either enhance the vision or subtly re-present it. We will examine the stories that are told by these portraits. We will also explore how, as society changes, so too do the stories that can be told.

Day: Saturday
Start date: 8 November 2014
Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
Full fee: £35.00

Ben Nicholson and his Contemporaries
Ben Nicholson worked at the heart of the emerging British avant-garde of the 20th century. He radically revisited core issues of abstraction and a need for a new visual language in the 1930s in the company of Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore, rolling his ideas out in St Ives in the period after the Second World War. We will chart his relationships with the others to look at the ways in which they collaborated, borrowed ideas and moved away from each other.

Day: Saturday
Start date: 31 January 2015
Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
Full fee: £35.00

Philosophies and the Practice of Art

What is art? How do artists create meaning? Who decides? How do we know what is good or beautiful? What does art ‘do’? Looking at artworks raises these and other questions. Jumping off from the Grayson Perry Reith lectures, we will use various texts, including excerpts from Kant, Tolstoy, Nochlin, Benjamin, De Botton, and set these alongside some key artworks. We will ‘worry’ our way through the questions and generate a range of some provisional answers.

Day: Saturday
Start date: 16 May 2015
Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
Full fee: £35.00